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Alex
August 19th, 2009, 03:16 PM
There's always drought, pestilence, and such that can affect our water - city or well.

So true but I can guard mine better then the Gov can.

Holding Pattern
August 19th, 2009, 08:23 PM
I understand that you're attached to your well but unless you're going to invite the rest of us over when things go bad, the rest of us have to talk about what to do. Sorry if that came across wrong but a vast majority of US residents don't have access to a well because we can't live outside of the city for various reasons.

im4Jesus
August 19th, 2009, 08:39 PM
True, most of us have to pay for our water.

HisAlways
August 19th, 2009, 09:24 PM
True, most of us have to pay for our water.

Yep.....I have a water meter, and the rates keep going up.

Pendragon
August 20th, 2009, 01:03 AM
Yep.....I have a water meter, and the rates keep going up.

I live in florida and even with a De Sal plant and being surrounded by water we have constant regulations on how much water we can use... Again we are surrounded by water it rains almost everyday yet we juet got to the point of being able to wash our cars in our driveways let alone water the lawn or fill the pool. without and excess water usage "TAX" the city coun ty and federal government know they can control it with the carbon tax.. Now for you that have wells let me ask this, If I am being taxed out my ears for water what is my next course of action??? if I am an honest christian I suck it up and take it..How many in our country can say they are? so where would I go to get cheap water??? Hmmm I know that guy out there with a well.. Just hope the cost of the electricity he has to pay isn't so high that he has paid the bill so the pump works..and the governemnt has't siezed it as of yet

Daniel1210
August 20th, 2009, 01:07 AM
As for commodities pricing, the commodities market is manipulated by the "big boys" and that's all there is to it.

Pendragon
August 20th, 2009, 02:03 AM
As for commodities pricing, the commodities market is manipulated by the "big boys" and that's all there is to it.

Yes it is but let's ask why???
reduced oil supply hmmm let's go green cap and trade??? hmm tax ownership of other industries?? when Oil went up almost 600% in a 36 month period starting in 2005 so did all the other prices with food and shipping costs meaning household budgets were stretched to meet that need which in turn meant some bills went unpaid... where the budget for a hosuehold took into account the ARM they signed up for in many cases no one saw the oil prices jump as well as food and goods and in turn money saved to pay up on ARM's in that case was redistribueted to accomadate Gas for cars to go to work... now the money put away was no longer there the dominoes tipped and those with ARM's begain to default... not alot at first but again once the dominoes are put into motion the rest start to fall how ever they are layed out.. As more dominoes fell there was some minor cut backs in the markets... Hourly service industry started to see this in cut backs of hours again another dominoe.. then there were lay off in 9-5 jobs meaning more cuts in service as more defaults on home loans happened.... Yes many abused the system which also added to the crisis but the oil and gas went up even further more defaults and hearlding in the need for green technology... Many asked why not drill here in the USA?? well gee that would bring prices down and the green plan would be silenced.. The green plan take control of major industry...So far banks and Major goods like appliances and thier parts, Cars and their parts, and Homes and their parts have dropped through the floor requiring the support of the government in some way. The only thing that surprises me is the telecommunications not being hit yet??? haven't figured out why that haasn't happened yet? but as for food,water and shelter they are the essentials that all require and with no money and no jobs and rising costs this requires more government to take control of more aspects of our lives.. including healthcare as no one has considered the fact that more people without jobs are getting treated with no insurance meaning providers are not being paid meaning a collapse of the healthcare system... Hmmm but had oil not jumped like it had in 2005 and 06 in the spikes none of this would have happened... Again look to the oil commdities brokers and buyers and you will see the manipulation.. now they have made great money in the oil markets it is time to take on many other commodities and drive prices even further higher to create a climate of more governemnt needed controls

Holding Pattern
August 22nd, 2009, 10:08 AM
Hmmm I know that guy out there with a well.. Just hope the cost of the electricity he has to pay isn't so high that he has paid the bill so the pump works..and the governemnt has't siezed it as of yet

Yes, if it isn't one thing it will be another. We can talk all day about water restrictions and then it will be electric restrictions...

Maybe new technology is the way to go...hook up a couple of solar panels to the well pump, or a wind generator and battery bank and then you don't have to pay the power for the well.

You have to take matters into your own hands creatively, find new solutions and resources. New technology does work, we're proof, it saves money and is reliable. And I don't have Satan in my heart because I'm using solar or wind, you know <boo, hiss> "green technology" We've been using it in one way or another for years now and the money we've saved has helped us to be on track to pay off the house many years early. Criticize all you want, but the technology is there to be independent. There is nothing evil about a solar panel and then you don't have to gripe about any regulations.

graybeard
August 22nd, 2009, 10:26 AM
Yes, if it isn't one thing it will be another. We can talk all day about water restrictions and then it will be electric restrictions...

Maybe new technology is the way to go...hook up a couple of solar panels to the well pump, or a wind generator and battery bank and then you don't have to pay the power for the well.

You have to take matters into your own hands creatively, find new solutions and resources. New technology does work, we're proof, it saves money and is reliable. And I don't have Satan in my heart because I'm using solar or wind, you know <boo, hiss> "green technology" We've been using it in one way or another for years now and the money we've saved has helped us to be on track to pay off the house many years early. Criticize all you want, but the technology is there to be independent. There is nothing evil about a solar panel and then you don't have to gripe about any regulations.

So who will be the first genius energy czar to implement a cap and trade tax to recover the losses from improper diversion of solar energy for the benefit of the individual? And that acid in your storage batteries is a toxic accident waiting to happen. Your storage area will have to be approved and inspected on an ongoing basis, and subject to remediation at any time......

Pendragon
August 28th, 2009, 09:32 AM
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/aug2009/db20090821_065859.htm

Commodities August 23, 2009, 7:45PM EST

Commodities August 23, 2009, 7:45PM EST text size: TTSugar Prices Reflect a Commodity Rife with Regulation
Trade restrictions on sugar by the U.S. and other nations have led to short supplies, doubled prices, and angry American food companies By Esm&#233; E. Deprez
Lufkin, Tex., a small city north of Houston, has been the home of family-owned Atkinson Candy since 1932. As sugar prices reach highs not seen in almost 30 years, that's about to change.

Sugar accounts for some 60&#37; of the ingredients used to make Atkinson's candies, such as its signature Chick-O-Sticks and Long Boys, says Eric Atkinson, the company's president and the grandson of the founder. Because the U.S. Agriculture Dept. places quotas on the amount of sugar that can be imported, the company has been forced at times to pay double what its international competitors pay. And with U.S. sugar prices nearly doubling so far this year, Atkinson has decided he has no choice but to reincorporate in Guatemala, where he can take advantage of lower, open-market sugar prices.

"There's still equity in 'Made in America,' but costs have been going up precipitously and customers have taken a hard line—they won't accept an increase in prices," says Atkinson. "If it was only about labor I could still be here—it's the price of sugar that we're having to leave for." Atkinson argues that "protectionist" measures intended to aid U.S. sugar growers and producers end up hurting domestic food and confectionery companies. At least 30 workers of his 225-member staff will lose their jobs, Atkinson estimates, as production shifts south. "We've been between this rock and hard place for 25 years," he says. "When you don't let the market control the commodity, this is what happens."


The price of the most active sugar futures contract soared from $11.70 on Oct. 24, 2008, to $22.97 on Aug. 12, 2009. That 96% increase happened much faster than the time it took the price of gasoline in the U.S. to double to more than $4 a gallon last summer. This provided new ammunition for American food companies, most of them much larger than Atkinson Candy, that have railed against the Agriculture Dept.'s quota policy for decades. In response to the recent price spikes, a group of large U.S. food companies sent a letter on Aug. 5 imploring Agriculture Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack to boost the sugar quotas. The companies, including Conagra Foods (CAG), General Mills (GIS), Hershey (HSY), and Kraft Foods (KFT), warned that government inaction could lead to higher consumer prices, job cuts, and "distorted" trade patterns.