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lighthouse
April 8th, 2010, 04:30 AM
Sunspots 1060 and 1061 are quiet and pose no threat for strong solar flares. Credit: SOHO/MDI

Sunspot number: 25
What is the sunspot number?
Updated 06 Apr 2010

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 0 days
2010 total: 6 days (6%)
2009 total: 260 days (71%)
Since 2004: 776 days
Typical Solar Min: 485 days
explanation | more info
Updated 06 Apr 2010

The Radio Sun
10.7 cm flux: 78 sfu
explanation | more data
Updated 06 Apr 2010


SPACE WEATHER
Current conditions
Solar wind
speed: 602.0 km/sec
density: 1.3 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 0915 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B3 0325 UT Apr08
24-hr: B3 0325 UT Apr08
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 0915 UT

lighthouse
April 13th, 2010, 04:38 PM
HUGE PROMINENCE: One of the biggest prominences in years erupted from the sun's northwestern limb today. The massive plasma-filled structure rose up and burst during a ~2 hour period around 0900 UT. Mark Townley sends this freeze-frame from his backyard observatory in Brierley Hill, West Midlands, UK:



The eruption hurled a bright coronal mass ejection (CME) into space: SOHO movie. The cloud is not heading toward Earth, at least not directly. A glancing blow from the outskirts of the CME is possible two to three days from now, but any impact is likely to be mild. The eruption was more photogenic than geoeffective
http://www.spaceweather.com/

caligal
April 14th, 2010, 11:37 AM
And according to scripture this is just a warm up. The thing that boggles me is the scientists running around going WHOA where did that come from!:hehee

lighthouse
April 15th, 2010, 05:29 AM
Low solar activity link to cold UK winters

The UK and continental Europe could be gripped by more frequent cold winters in the future as a result of low solar activity, say researchers.

They identified a link between fewer sunspots and atmospheric conditions that "block" warm, westerly winds reaching Europe during winter months
The Maunder Minimum occurred in the latter half of the 17th Century - a period when Europe experienced a series of harsh winters, which has been dubbed by some as the Little Ice Age. Following this, there was a gradual increase in solar activity that lasted 300 years.

Professor Lockwood explained that studies of activity on the Sun, which provides data stretching back over 9,000 years, showed that it tended to "ramp up quite slowly over about a 300-year period, then drop quite quickly over about a 100-year period".

He said the present decline started in 1985 and was currently about "half way back to a Maunder Minimum condition".

This allowed the team to compare recent years with what happened in the late 1600s.

"We found that you could accommodate both the Maunder Minimum and the last few years into the same framework," he told BBC News

lighthouse
April 15th, 2010, 05:44 PM
MIDWESTERN FIREBALL: Last night, around 10:05 pm CDT, sky watchers in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois and Missouri witnessed a brilliant green fireball streaking across the sky. Images from a rooftop webcam in Madison, Wisconsin, show a brilliant midair explosion:


Credit: University of Wisconsin - AOS/SSEC

The fireball was caused by a small asteroid hitting Earth's atmosphere at a shallow angle. Preliminary infrasound measurements place the energy of the blast at 20 tons of TNT (0.02 kton), with considerable uncertainty. Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office estimates that the space rock was about 1 meter wide and massed some 1260 kg. "Fireballs of this size are surprisingly common," he notes. "They hit Earth about 14 times a month, on average, although most go unnoticed because they appear during the day or over unpopulated areas."






The Earth-facing side of the sun is blank--no sunspots. Credit: SOHO/MDI

Sunspot number: 12
What is the sunspot number?
Updated 14 Apr 2010

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 0 days
2010 total: 7 days (7%)
2009 total: 260 days (71%)
Since 2004: 777 days
Typical Solar Min: 485 days
explanation | more info
Updated 14 Apr 2010

The Radio Sun
10.7 cm flux: 75 sfu
explanation | more data
Updated 14 Apr 2010

http://www.spaceweather.com/

caligal
May 10th, 2010, 04:03 PM
There sure are alot of eruptions going on in the sun. I'm glad none of it has been directed straight at us..........so far.

lighthouse
May 12th, 2010, 05:44 PM
There are no sunspots on the Earth-facing side of the sun. Credit: SOHO/MDI

Sunspot number: 0
What is the sunspot number?
Updated 11 May 2010

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 3 days
2010 total: 24 days (18%)
2009 total: 260 days (71%)
Since 2004: 794 days
Typical Solar Min: 485 days
explanation | more info
Updated 11 May 2010

The Radio Sun
10.7 cm flux: 74 sfu
explanation | more data
Updated 11 May 2010

caligal
May 20th, 2010, 09:17 PM
That large solar filament is starting to worry them a little.

lighthouse
June 7th, 2010, 04:19 AM
Sunspot 1076 is rotating over the sun's western limb. Credit: SOHO/MDI

Sunspot number: 12
What is the sunspot number?
Updated 06 Jun 2010

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 0 days
2010 total: 33 days (21%)
2009 total: 260 days (71%)
Since 2004: 801 days
Typical Solar Min: 486 days
explanation | more info
Updated 06 Jun 2010

The Radio Sun
10.7 cm flux: 68 sfu
explanation | more data
Updated 06 Jun 2010

http://www.spaceweather.com/

lighthouse
June 7th, 2010, 04:25 AM
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/04jun_swef/

June 4, 2010: Earth and space are about to come into contact in a way that's new to human history. To make preparations, authorities in Washington DC are holding a meeting: The Space Weather Enterprise Forum at the National Press Club on June 8th.


Many technologies of the 21st century are vulnerable to solar storms. [more] Richard Fisher, head of NASA's Heliophysics Division, explains what it's all about:

"The sun is waking up from a deep slumber, and in the next few years we expect to see much higher levels of solar activity. At the same time, our technological society has developed an unprecedented sensitivity to solar storms. The intersection of these two issues is what we're getting together to discuss."



Bogdan's favorite NASA satellite, however, is an old one: the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) launched in 1997. "Where would we be without it?" he wonders. ACE is a solar wind monitor. It sits upstream between the sun and Earth, detecting solar wind gusts, billion-ton CMEs, and radiation storms as much as 30 minutes before they hit our planet.

"ACE is our best early warning system," says Bogdan. "It allows us to notify utility and satellite operators when a storm is about to hit.”

NASA spacecraft were not originally intended for operational forecasting—"but it turns out that our data have practical economic and civil uses," notes Fisher. "This is a good example of space science supporting modern society."

2010 marks the 4th year in a row that policymakers, researchers, legislators and reporters have gathered in Washington DC to share ideas about space weather. This year, forum organizers plan to sharpen the focus on critical infrastructure protection. The ultimate goal is to improve the nation’s ability to prepare, mitigate, and respond to potentially devastating space weather events.

"I believe we're on the threshold of a new era in which space weather can be as influential in our daily lives as ordinary terrestrial weather." Fisher concludes. "We take this very seriously indeed