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lighthouse
August 10th, 2011, 04:50 AM
PERSEID METEOR SHOWER: Earth is entering a stream of debris from Comet Swift-Tuttle, source of the annual Perseid meteor shower. International observers are now reporting more than a dozen Perseids per hour, a number that will increase as the shower reaches its peak on August 12-13. Full moonlight will reduce visibility on peak night, but not enough to completely spoil the show--especially when the ISS is scheduled to make an appearance among the meteors. Get the full story from Science@NASA. Bonus links: live meteor radar, ISS tracker.

MAJOR FLARE, NOT EARTH-DIRECTED: On August 9th at 0805 UT, sunspot 1263 produced an X7-class solar flare--only the third X-flare of new Solar Cycle 24 and the most powerful so far. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the explosion's extreme ultraviolet flash:



The brunt of the explosion was not Earth directed. Nevertheless, radiation from the flare created waves of ionization in Earth's upper atmosphere, briefly disrupting communications at some VLF and HF radio frequencies. The blast also accelerated a mild torrent of protons toward Earth; they can be seen speckling the images in this SOHO movie of a CME emerging from the blast site. The CME will probably miss Earth. At this time, however, we cannot rule out a glancing blow from the flank of the cloud on August 11th or 12th. Stay tuned for additional analysis. Solar flare alerts: text, voice.

X-flares of Solar Cycle 24: Feb. 15, 2011 (X2), March 9, 2011 (X1), Aug. 9, 2011 (X7). Before these three, the previous X-flare occured on Dec.14, 2006, (X1) during old Solar Cycle 23.

http://www.spaceweather.com/

On August 10, 2011 there were 1241 potentially hazardous asteroids.

lighthouse
August 22nd, 2011, 05:04 AM
GROWING SUNSPOTS: After a weekend of quiet decay, sunspots 1271 and 1272 are growing again.


The increase in size has not yet translated into a significant increase in flares. Solar activity remains low, although this could change if the sunspots' evolving magnetic fields become unstable and erupt
New sunspot 1275 poses no threat for strong flares. Overall, solar activity is low.


http://www.spaceweather.com/

CitySearcher
September 6th, 2011, 12:09 PM
Hi Lighthouse! I can't believe you've kept this thread going for almost five years. Great job!

Goodbye to Comet Elenin? :


"Now it is absolutely clear that the comet’s drop in brightness, first noted by Michael Mattiazzo on Aug. 20th, was not coincidental – the decay process had already begun, and over the course of the next several days the comet changed greatly. Its pseudo-nucleus became diffuse and extended, and later vanished completely. On images from Sept. 1st in the comet’s coma there was no condensation visible, and that meant the comet had already broken up into fairly small pieces, with a maximum size of not more than a hundred meters."
http://www.huliq.com/12092/doomsday-comet-elenin-disintegrating-meeting-its-own-doomsday

CitySearcher
September 6th, 2011, 12:14 PM
There are two comets currently visiting the inner solar system — comet Elenin and comet Garradd — so the next two months will provide some excellent opportunities to observe these unusual visitors. The sky map of the two comets here shows they locations over the next few weeks.

http://www.space.com/12746-comet-elenin-comet-garradd-night-sky-observing-tips.html

lighthouse
September 28th, 2011, 04:48 AM
Solar wind
speed: 494.9 km/sec
density: 0.0 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 0936 UT




X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: C2 0244 UT Sep28
24-hr: C2 0244 UT Sep28
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 0900 UT

lighthouse
November 7th, 2011, 04:44 AM
CHANCE OF FLARES: Big sunspot 1339 has quieted since a flurry of M-flares on Saturday, but the active region still poses a threat for strong eruptions. NOAA forecasters estimate a 70% chance of M-flares and a 10% chance of X-flares during the next 24 hours. Solar flare alerts: text, voice.

ASTEROID FLYBY: NASA radars are monitoring 2005 YU55, an asteroid the size of an aircraft carrier, as it heads for a Nov. 8th flyby of the Earth-Moon system. There is no danger to our planet. At closest approach on Tuesday at 3:28 pm PST (23:28 UT), the 400m-wide space rock will be 324,600 kilometers away, about 85% the distance from Earth to the Moon.

lighthouse
November 13th, 2011, 05:19 AM
GRAND FILAMENT: A filament of magnetism more than 700,000 km long is curling around the sun's northeastern limb. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory photographed the vast structure during the early hours of Nov. 12th:



The filament is weighted down by solar plasma. If it erupts--as such filaments are prone to do--it could fall to the stellar surface below, setting off an explosion called a Hyder flare. Or it might fly upward, hurling fragments of itself into space. Amateur astronomers with solar telescopes are encouraged to monitor the region for developments. The only challenge will be fitting the whole thing into a single field of view. Solar flare alerts: text, voice.

http://www.spaceweather.com/

lighthouse
December 28th, 2011, 06:04 PM
http://www.spaceweather.com/



CHANCE OF MAGNETIC STORMS: NOAA forecasters estimate a 20% to 40% chance of polar geomagnetic storms on Dec. 28-29 in response to the arrival of one or more CMEs.
ON MARS, TOO: Sunspot 1387 erupted on Christmas day, hurling a coronal mass ejection (CME) directly toward Mars. According to analysts at the Goddard Space Weather Lab, impact will occur on Dec. 30th at 1800 UT (+/- 7 hr). Click to view an animated forecast track
Unlike Earth, Mars does not have a global magnetic field. Instead, the Red Planet has "magnetic umbrellas." These are fossil remnants of an ancient global magnetic field that decayed billions of years ago. When a CME hits Mars, the action happens in the umbrellas' canopies. Because the umbrellas are scattered around Mars, martian auroras can theoretically occur even near the equator.

lighthouse
December 28th, 2011, 06:05 PM
http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Scales Activity
Range 1 (minor) to 5 (extreme)
NOAA Scale Past 24 hours Current
Geomagnetic Storms *
Solar Radiation Storms
Radio Blackouts

lighthouse
January 22nd, 2012, 06:39 AM
CME IMPACT: A coronal mass ejection (CME) hit Earth's magnetic field at 0617 UT on Jan. 22nd. At first the impact did not appear to be a strong one: the solar wind speed barely lifted itself to ~400 km/s when the CME passed by. Now, however, in the wake of the CME, a dense and increasingly geoeffective solar wind stream is blowing around Earth, setting the stage for possible auroras on the night of Jan. 22nd


Solar wind
speed: 424.5 km/sec
density: 11.7 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1226 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: C2 0854 UT Jan22
24-hr: C7 0257 UT Jan22
explanation | more data
http://www.spaceweather.com/

2012-01-20 16:35 G1 (Minor) Geomagnetic Storm Possible January 23

SWPC Forecasters have determined that the CME from NOAA Region 1402 near disk center yesterday will likely pass above (north) of Earth. This glancing blow will cause just G1 (Minor) Geomagnetic Storm activity. Look for the first signs of it around 1800Z (1:00 pm EST) on Sunday, January 22, with the bulk of the disturbance to occur Monday, January 23. Watch here for updates.
http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/