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Thread: Volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupts in rural southern Iceland, homes evacuated and emergency declared

  1. #141
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    I find it morbid that this picture is both gorgeous, yet saddening.

  2. #142
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    Default A million Britons stranded by ash and food shortages expected

    One million Britons were stranded abroad last night by the travel paralysis caused by volcanic ash.

    The unprecedented air lockdown was extended until at least 7am today but the chaos and confusion will drift well into next week.

    Some holidaymakers in Spain were told they face a ten-day wait for a flight home and the delays - coming at the end of the Easter holiday period - intensified problems caused by the massive Icelandic eruption.

    Schoolchildren, and their teachers, will be missing from classrooms on Monday, and Britain faces shortages of air-freighted food as the impact of the vast spume of ash begins to bite beyond air travel.

    Fruit and vegetables including lettuce, grapes, spring onions and asparagus may be missing from many supermarket shelves next week and firms specialising in flying in produce from overseas are also warning of higher prices.

    The transport giant Norbert Dentressangle said activity at its perishable air freight handling centre at Heathrow, the UK's largest, was at a standstill. The result will be a three-day shortfall in the supply of products including prepacked fruit salads and flowers.

    It said that while there are enough products on shelves and in warehouses to see stores through the weekend, supermarkets will be 'severely impacted' next week.


    Some desperate travellers were paying hundreds of pounds for taxis to bring them back via ferries from Ireland or to take them into Europe.

    Forecasters say there is no imminent change in the wind direction to blow the vast cloud away from Britain and large swathes of northern Europe.

    Day two of the chaos caused by the Mount Eyjafjallokull eruption saw the first reports of volcanic ash settling in the UK, as World Health Organisation officials suggested people consider wearing masks if they venture outside.

    And as Transport Secretary Lord Adonis told travellers to expect ' significant disruption' for at least 48 hours, the cost to airlines alone was put at an astonishing £200million a day.

    There was one chink of light when air traffic control company Nats lifted flight restrictions for much of Scotland and Northern Ireland. BA said it would operate 'a number of flights' from the U.S. into Scotland overnight.





    Read the rest here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...kdown-7am.html

  3. #143
    stonewallfan Guest

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    http://www.drudgereport.com/

    This headline is something else "The day the Earth stood still". (That says it all for the time which we live in)

  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by stonewallfan View Post
    http://www.drudgereport.com/

    This headline is something else "The day the Earth stood still". (That says it all for the time which we live in)
    Insane, huh?

  5. #145
    yogi3939 Guest

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    Looking at some of the posts above I can only think of how ill prepared we are for even a minor, historically speaking, event such as this one. What would we do if a truly big one happened? But we may find out if Katla goes off. What were the estimates for katla, ten to a hundred times worse than the current eruption if it goes off?

    We are only a couple of days into this one and already they are talking food shortages. What made this possible? One answer is that we moved away from locally grown food and locally manufactured products. We now depend on some seriously huge conglomerates for produce and products from around the world. Disrupt that international flow for even as little as a week or two and people would be in trouble in many parts of the world. Disrupt it for a month and a lot more people would die. It could even be worse than a pandemic in the long run since it would directly affect many more people than a disease.

  6. #146
    Zerozx Guest

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    Volcanic ash grounds flights across much of Europe - http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE63E1TM20100417

    (Reuters) - A huge ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano spread out across Europe on Friday causing air travel chaos on a scale unseen since the September 11 attacks and costing airlines hundreds of millions of dollars.

    The plume that floated through the upper atmosphere, where it could wreak havoc on jet engines and airframes, threw travel plans into disarray on both sides of the Atlantic.

    Severe disruption of European air traffic was expected on Saturday because of the dangers posed by the volcanic ash, aviation officials said. Airports in much of Britain, France and Germany remained closed and flights were set to be grounded in Hungary and parts of Romania.

    "I am furious and frustrated," said Sara Bicoccih, stranded at Frankfurt airport on her way home to Italy from Miami.

    The U.S. military had to reroute many flights, including those evacuating the wounded from Afghanistan and Iraq, a Pentagon spokesman said.

    "I would think Europe was probably experiencing its greatest disruption to air travel since 9/11," a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Authority, Britain's aviation regulator, said.

    "In terms of closure of airspace, this is worse than after 9/11. The disruption is probably larger than anything we've probably seen."

    Following the attacks on Washington and New York in 2001, U.S. airspace was closed for three days and European airlines were forced to halt all transatlantic services.

    Disruption from the volcanic ash eruption in Iceland is costing airlines more than $200 million a day, air industry group the International Air Transport Association said.

    But unless the cloud disrupts flights for weeks, threatening factories' supply chains, economists do not think it will significantly slow Europe's shaky recovery from recession or affect second-quarter gross domestic product figures.

    "The overall impact should be very limited even if the problem persists for a day or more ... ," IHS Global Insight chief UK and European economist Howard Archer said.

    Volcanologists say the ash could cause problems to air traffic for up to six months if the eruption continues. The financial impact on airlines could be significant.

    The fallout hit airline shares on Friday with Lufthansa, British Airways, Air Berlin, Air France-KLM, Iberia and Ryanair down between 1.4 and 3.0 percent.

    BA canceled all flights in and out of London on Saturday.

    Irish airline Ryanair, Europe's biggest low-cost carrier, said it would cancel flights to and from northern European countries until 1200 GMT on Monday.

    Aviation officials said airspace over England and Wales, Germany and northern France would remain closed at least through Saturday morning.

    David Castelveter, a spokesman with the Air Transport Association of America trade group, said U.S. airlines had canceled at least 170 flights to and from Europe.

    Delta Air Lines, the world's largest airline, canceled 75 flights between the United States and European Union on Friday and for Saturday, it has halted 35 flights from the EU to the United States, Delta spokesman Anthony Black said.

    PLUME DRIFTING

    Joe Sultana, head of network operations at European air control agency Eurocontrol, said the situation was unprecedented. Eurocontrol said it was up to each country when flights were resumed, based on whether there was clear air, which depended on wind direction.

    Clear airspace that had been over Vienna and Geneva was closing, so they could be affected.

    Mark Seltzer, a forecaster at Britain's Met Office, said that on Thursday the plume affected northern Scotland because of northwesterly winds at high levels.

    "However, the winds have become, at upper levels, more westerly and that is steering it more into Scandinavia, taking it away from Scotland and Northern Ireland."

    The volcano began erupting on Wednesday for the second time in a month from below the Eyjafjallajokull glacier, hurling a plume of ash 6 to 11 km (4 to 7 miles) into the atmosphere.

    Officials said it was still spewing magma and although the eruption could abate in the coming days, ash would continue drifting into the skies of Europe.

    Iceland's Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said there was some damage to roads and barriers protecting farms.

    "There is still an evacuation of around 20 farms, which is 40 to 50 people," she added, noting this was less than the 800 people who had been evacuated earlier this week.

    MERKEL DIVERTED

    Volcanic ash contains tiny particles of glass and pulverized rock that can damage engines and airframes.

    In 1982, a British Airways jumbo jet lost power in all its engines when it flew into an ash cloud over Indonesia, gliding toward the ground before it was able to restart its engines.

    The incident prompted the aviation industry to rethink the way it prepared for ash clouds.

    In addition to travel problems, health officials warned that the volcanic ash could also prove harmful to those with breathing difficulties.

    In Brussels, European aviation control officials said some 12,000 to 13,000 flights were likely to operate in European airspace on Friday, compared with about 29,500 normally. The ash was expected to spread further south and east.

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel, returning from a trip to the United States, was diverted to Portugal and was expected to spend the night in Lisbon.

    However, the Polish president's funeral looked set to go ahead on Sunday as planned, at his family's insistence, despite some world leaders being unable to fly in.

    The air problems have proved a boon for other transport firms. All 58 Eurostar trains between Britain and Europe were operating full, carrying some 46,500 passengers, and a spokeswoman said they would consider adding more services.

    London taxi firm Addison Lee said it had taken requests for journeys to Paris, Milan, Zurich and Salzburg in Austria.

    Singer Whitney Houston took a ferry from Britain to Ireland for three concerts in Dublin after her flight was scratched.

  7. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi3939 View Post
    Looking at some of the posts above I can only think of how ill prepared we are for even a minor, historically speaking, event such as this one. What would we do if a truly big one happened? But we may find out if Katla goes off. What were the estimates for katla, ten to a hundred times worse than the current eruption if it goes off?

    We are only a couple of days into this one and already they are talking food shortages. What made this possible? One answer is that we moved away from locally grown food and locally manufactured products. We now depend on some seriously huge conglomerates for produce and products from around the world. Disrupt that international flow for even as little as a week or two and people would be in trouble in many parts of the world. Disrupt it for a month and a lot more people would die. I could even be worse than a pandemic in the long run since it would directly affect many more people than a disease.
    This is too true. People depend on the government and trade and all that stuff way too much. Just like you said.

    Pretty soon people are going to have to start depending on God. He's the only one in control and the world is going to go insane (especially since they continue to turn their backs on Him).

  8. #148
    yogi3939 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Megan View Post
    This is too true. People depend on the government and trade and all that stuff way too much. Just like you said.

    Pretty soon people are going to have to start depending on God. He's the only one in control and the world is going to go insane (especially since they continue to turn their backs on Him).
    Yes that was the point. The supply chain has gotten so huge and so far spread around the world that we do not have the capability to pick up the slack for any extended period of time on a local basis. It could take from six months to a year just to bring local farming up to speed for even subsistance level production of food. If something like the eruption of Katla, or worse, were to happen it would be difficult to transport food from one end of our country to the other. We would have to develop a food chain that extended no more than two or three states away from the consumers. With enough ash in the air even long distance trucking would be a problem. Rail distribution could extend that somewhat farther but they would still have trouble keeping the ash out of critical systems in the engines and control networks.

    But those of us in the southeast could still eat kudzu. After all it is edible.

  9. #149
    stonewallfan Guest

  10. #150
    yogi3939 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by stonewallfan View Post
    A telling quote from the article.

    Is it a first? The devastating 19th-century eruption of Indonesia's Krakatau island was bigger. In ancient times, Mount Vesuvius buried an entire city and in the 17th century, a series of eruptions from Peru to the South Pacific blocked the sun's energy and sent the Earth's temperatures plunging.

    But in this era of global trade crisscrossing the planet by air, the Icelandic eruption has implications that underscore the particular vulnerabilities of the modern world.

  11. #151
    cocopea9052 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi3939 View Post
    A telling quote from the article.
    Yep, very telling indeed.

    I don't know why, but all the scenes I see and news I hear just really puts an image of right after the Rapture in my mind.... I suppose this line added to that:

    It left behind stranded travelers, grounded cargo flights, political confusion
    And again this:

    Potentially lifesaving organs, too, were stuck in transit.

    All organs that usually get flown out to patients were instead being distributed to those within driving distance.

    "Hearts, lungs and livers, which are normally transported by air, are now delivered regionally and by ground travel," said Nadine Koerner, a spokeswoman for the German Foundation for Organ Transplant.
    Can you imagine folks just about to have surgery or waiting on an organ to arrive right after the Rapture.....

  12. #152
    Soma Sema Guest

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    Here's a video from Iceland, showing ex-green pastures and poor horsies

  13. #153
    Zerozx Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soma Sema View Post
    Here's a video from Iceland, showing ex-green pastures and poor horsies
    Soma, I just noticed you are from Iceland. How do things look from your point of view? Is it scary, in a way?

  14. #154
    Soma Sema Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zerozx View Post
    Soma, I just noticed you are from Iceland. How do things look from your point of view? Is it scary, in a way?
    Not really, I'm in the capital ~120km from the volcano, so I haven't noticed anything here. And as long as the wind blows the ash to the east, it will not come here.

  15. #155
    Soma Sema Guest

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    And you can finally see the volcano from the webcams! No clouds anymore.

    This is the best one

  16. #156
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    British air traffic officials extend UK airspace closure to 1900 UK time and re-apply restrictions to Scottish airspace.
    http://wireupdate.com/wires/3113/bno-eu-bulletin-16/

  17. #157
    Ironguild Guest

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    Get a look at this creepy satellite image!

  18. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi3939 View Post
    We are only a couple of days into this one and already they are talking food shortages. What made this possible? One answer is that we moved away from locally grown food and locally manufactured products. We now depend on some seriously huge conglomerates for produce and products from around the world. Disrupt that international flow for even as little as a week or two and people would be in trouble in many parts of the world. Disrupt it for a month and a lot more people would die. It could even be worse than a pandemic in the long run since it would directly affect many more people than a disease.
    yogi,

    Well, we in CA are for our northern CA neighbors who have lost their jobs, farms, livelyhood due to the Delta Smelt.

    (It's a fish, in case you haven't been keeping up with the news.)

    They're unable to grow crops that the whole world depends on for food, because the EPA has to protect these little fishes.

    thsi woldr hsa gnoe mda







    I know y'all could read that!!

  19. #159
    stonewallfan Guest

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    http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/04...main-fly-zone/


    "The activity has been quite vigorous overnight, causing the eruption column to grow," Icelandic geologist Magnus Tumi Gudmundsson told The Associated Press on Saturday. "It's the magma mixing with the water that creates the explosivity. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be an end in sight."

    An expansive cloud of grit hovered over parts of western Europe on Saturday, triggering extended flight bans that seemed likely to disrupt world leaders' plans to attend Sunday's state funeral for Polish President Lech Kaczynski and his wife Maria in the southern city of Krakow.

    South Korean Prime Minister Chung Un-chan was the first to announce he was canceling his trip to Poland, while President Barack Obama, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and German Chancellor Angela Merkel still planned to attend. Kaczynski's family has said they want the funeral to go ahead as planned.



    Aviation experts say the volcanic plume has caused the worst travel disruption Europe -- and the world has ever seen

  20. #160
    Cornerstone Guest

    Default Just Wondering

    Can't help but wonder if God isn't putting people back on the Earth (grounding flights, maybe worldwide if it gets really bad) where we actually belong before some HUGE event, an awakening? Hmmmm.....
    Last edited by Cornerstone; April 17th, 2010 at 08:46 AM. Reason: Give more meaning

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